My Style Has No Style

“My [singing] style really has no style, because I try to sing each number differently. I’ve always believed that if style takes precedence over the words and music, the audience get’s cheated. It’s like when people see a fine play or movie. They imagine themselves in the leading role. I want them to imagine that they’re singing – not just listening to someone else.”
~Judy Garland

Desmond Is Lady Kier Is Amazing

Loving this insanity. Desmond got the looks…clock it… even Good Beat! This makes me happy. There is hope after all.

10, 10, 10, 10, 9 (so shady), 10 10 – This category is shut down – Give it to the child. Give the child the trophy. This is the future, people. ¡FUTURA!

Behind The Scenes of Halston

Halston, sure…but JERIANA!

The talented Miss San Juan’s costumes were critical to the success of the project. The series is a fast forward fashion flight from ’68 to ’90 and that’s a lot of garment bags, people. Heavy ones. Approximately fifty-million costumes were required for this gigantic fashion feature production and Jeriana and her crew got them all right. The result is authenticity with effect. Detail queens?…you may sit down now. Everything is perfect.

Brava G. S. J.

Costumes? Naildit.

LADIES…Number twenty, “CourregE-ish mono-new-clothes-osis.”
ULTRA BEAUTIES.
BEST HAIR AT VERSAILLE.
Halston HIGH hand holding? CHECK.
HOURS AND hours of calculated swish.
LOOK THAT UP IN YOUR FUNK AND DIAGONALS. ASYMMETRY WAS OBSERVED.
Pat pose number one hundred and forty seven, “Egyptian Feelings.” Leave it alone, it’s Dilone.

Check Out The New Richard Bernstein Shop

My good friend Rodney Kizziah with The Estate of Richard Bernstein has created an amazing shop featuring the work of Interview Magazine cover artist and airbrush legend, Richard Bernstein. These limited edition prints and movie star masks are genius and to-ta-lly gorgeous. GET IT SASSY!

Ultimate gift alert! Git em. Give em. Git another one for yourself. GO!

RICHARDBERSTEINSHOP.COM

Halston – Directed by Dan Minahan – starts May 14th on Netflix

BillyBeyond.com
Halston;'s to do list includes...

“TO DO LIST: Withdraw $40,000.00 for orchid bill – Don’t forget to send Thank-You Kaftan to Dan – Try, really try to invent something entirely new by midnight tonight. “

BillyBeyond.com
Gian Franco Rodriguez plays Victor Hugo in Halston (2021)

Gian Franco Rodriguez is all Victor Hugo. This performance is 100% approved by BillyBeyond.com. ☑️

Boyculture Polaroid_HALSTON_103_Unit_02046RC2_sign

Krysta Rodriguez as Liza is a tour de force, singing in her own voice and dancing as Liza you will be convinced, amazed and most of sucessfully entertained by her magnificent display of talent. To put it “simply,” Ewan McGregor is Halston. He lives. You’ll die.

BillyBeyond.com
Krysta Rodriguez plays Liza Minelli in Halston (2021)

Amazing with a “Z.”

BillyBeyond.com
Rebecca Dayan plays Elsa Peretti in Halston (2021)

Rebecca Dayan plays Elsa. There’s only two Peretti’s. Elsa, and Rebecca as Elsa. She’s so gorgeous that she’s hard to see and hear at the same time. Anticipate rewinding. This level of beauty deserves multiple replays. Encore de Dayan!

BillyBeyond.com
Ewan McGregor plays Halston in Halston -(2021)

“Yes, I’m still holding for Dan…hello?… ( muzak sound cue ) Halston… Halston…calling for Daniel Minahan…”

BillyBeyond.com
Joel Schumacher as played by Rory Culkin in Halston (2021)

Rory Culkin plays Halston’s bestie, the late Joel Schumacher. Good hair, right? May I just throw out a beauty note here please? The make-up is timely perfection. You can all relax.

Billybeyond.com
David Pittu plays Joe Eula in Halston (2021)

I wouldn’t say David “played” Joe Eula. It’s better to say he embodied him. It’s more than a portrayal and it’s spooky-good. (David Pittu is Joe Eula, famed fashion illustrator and Halston’s creative director.)

Gee, I wonder who choreographed all the runway scenes?

That’d be me. There will be turning, running, smiling finales avec complex pivots as well as several split-doubles and yes, the rumours on the runways are true. We do split a triple in episode four. Models, prepare for your masterclass.

Halston, the limited series premieres on Netflix on May 14.

These images were released on what would’ve been Halston’s 89th birthday (he died of AIDS complications at 57 years old, in1990. RIP.)

Hopi Squash Blossom: The story behind Princess Leia’s hairstyle

After news of Carrie Fisher’s untimely death spread, fans took to social media to pay tribute to the film star.

Amidst the outpouring of grief, one image was repeated again and again: little girls, their hair in two perfect “cinnamon buns”, smiling for the camera.

Fisher was, of course, much more than the role she won aged 19, yet Princess Leia – and an iconic hairstyle – have come to symbolise the actress, author and script doctor.

Fisher took it in her stride, telling Time Out in 2014: “I am Leia and Leia is me. We’ve overlapped each other because my life has been so cartoony or superhero-like. By this age, it would be ridiculous if I had a problem with it.”

But what is it about that particular hairstyle – which only appeared in the first film – which has sparked so many imaginations over the years? And where did it come from?

According to Brandon Alinger, the author of Star Wars Costumes: The Original Trilogy, the buns do not even appear in any of the concept artwork done for Leia in the preparation of the film.

In later interviews, Star Wars creator George Lucas said he looked to Mexico’s female revolutionaries, or “soldaderas”, who joined the uprising at the start of the 20th Century.

“I went with a kind of south-western Pancho Villa woman revolutionary look, which is what that is. The buns are basically from turn-of-the-century Mexico,” Lucas told Time in 2002.

The hairstyle was first worn by unmarried Hopi women in Arizona 
It makes sense to look to such a band of women when creating a character far removed from a traditional princess awaiting rescue.

“George didn’t want a damsel in distress, didn’t want your stereotypical princess – he wanted a fighter, he wanted someone who was independent,” Fisher explained to the BBC in 1977.

The Squash Blossom as a Symbol of Fertility 
There is only one problem with Lucas’s claim. Female Mexican revolutionaries are not known for their hairstyles – or certainly not hairstyles of that sort.

“As much as I would like to say that Princess Leia’s hairstyle was based on the ‘soldaderas’ from the Mexican Revolution, this was probably not the case,” Tabea Linhard, author of Fearless women in the Mexican Revolution and the Spanish Civil War, told the BBC.

“If you take a look at photos from the period, you see women with long braids, some wear hats, on occasion they cover their hair with a shawl.

“Conditions on the battlefields were harsh, and the women’s task included carrying supplies, taking care of all the men’s needs, serving as spies or smugglers; some also participated in battle.

“So a hairstyle like Leia’s probably was not a convenient option.”

However, the hairstyle does appear to have roots in North American history.

Kendra Van Cleave of Frock Flicks, a website which reviews the accuracy of costumes in historical dramas, told the BBC that while such buns had been fashionable in medieval Europe, the “most obvious” inspiration is the “squash blossom” style worn by women of the Hopi tribe in Arizona.

She said: “This consists of two side arrangements which aren’t actually buns – they’re more loops of hair.

“The hair is parted in the centre, then wrapped around a U-shaped ‘hair bow’ made of wood. The hair is wrapped in a figure of eight pattern, then tied at the middle and spread out to create the two semi-circles.

“This hairstyle became more widely known in the early 20th century due to photography,” says Ms Van Cleave, who adds it saw a revival in the 1920s.
Source

Yes, this hairstyle is called the squash blossom whorl, and it is the traditional hairstyle for unmarried girls in the Hopi tribe.

HAIR CHECK!!!

Jean Laporte 101

Jean Laporte was among the first to offer an alternative to mass perfumery by founding L’Artisan Parfumeur in 1976. He made it famous, then left it in an attempt to revive the true art of perfumery. In 1988, Jean-Francois Laporte founded the house of Maitre Parfumeur et Gantier, inspired by the great French perfumers of the 17th and 18th century. Perfumes and perfumed gloves is what he sold in his boutique on Rue D’Opera, Paris. He used a secret antique process that permanently embedded an enduring fragrance into the fine skins which he made his gloves from. Amazing. The house of Jean Laporte is owned now by Jean-Paul Millet Lage, who was taught by Jean Laporte. After leaving his second successful project, Jean Laporte continued his way futher to the roots of perfumery. He founded Le Jardin du Parfumeur in Burgundy (according to Denyse Beaulieu).

Jean Laporte couldn’t abide the compromises between art and comercial perfume-making. He narrowed the meaning of niche perfumery until he came to its very source- a blooming garden. Jean Laporte, as a true artist, made his way without advertizing…ever! His talent didn’t need the attention of the masses, but being so bright, he always enjoyed it. Thanks to him, we now enjoy great L’Artisan Parfumeur creations, the most celebrated of them being Mure et Musc, popularized in New York City by “the Elsa Maxwell of the East Village,” the late John Badum.

Jean Laporte. The finest fragrances available, quite simply.